Estimation of Cost Required to Elevate US Ports in Response to Climate Change: A Thought Exercise for Climate Critical Resources

TitleEstimation of Cost Required to Elevate US Ports in Response to Climate Change: A Thought Exercise for Climate Critical Resources
Publication TypeWorking Paper
AuthorsHippe, A., A. Becker, M. Fischer, and B. Schwegler
Year of Publication2015
NumberWP-138
Date Published12/8/2015
Abstract

This paper outlines a model for estimating the cost of elevating coastal seaport infrastructure in the United States to prevent potential damage from the effects of climate change. This estimation is a thought exercise to provoke consideration of the cumulative monetary and material demands of widespread adaptation of seaport infrastructure. This model estimates the combined cost of adding additional fill material to raise the working surface and reconstructing the yard to find an approximate unit area cost as a function of the necessary elevation increase for a generic port. The unit area cost is then combined with national estimates of storm surge increase by region and port area data to develop an estimate for the cost of elevating all United States commercial coastal ports in the World Port Index. Estimates of storm increase for the East Coast, Gulf Coast and West Coast are used to demonstrate anticipated variation in necessary port elevation between these regions and the resulting variation in cost. The use of a generic port model allows for the estimation of the material and monetary demands of entire regions, which would be infeasible if calculations were performed on an individualized port-by- port basis. Combined, these regional cost estimates predict a minimum of 62 billion to 88 billion dollars to elevate all United States commercial coastal ports in the World Port Index, as well as 495 million cubic meters of fill.

KeywordsClimate Change Adaptation, Cost Estimation, maritime infrastructure, Planning, ports, sea level rise, Site Layout
AttachmentSize
WP138.pdf1.11 MB

Last modified Wed, 9 Dec, 2015 at 15:48