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California High-Speed Rail Project: A Study of the Palo Alto Section

TitleCalifornia High-Speed Rail Project: A Study of the Palo Alto Section
Publication TypeTechnical Report
Year of Publication2010
AuthorsAckerman-Greenberg, A, Werner, G, Yee, A, Farr, J, Vanderboll, S
IssueTR189
Date Published03/2010
PublisherCIFE
Publication Languageeng
Keywords3-D, Center for Integrated Facility Engineering, CIFE, Cost Estimation, Design, High Speed Rail, Product Models, Stanford University, Validation, VDC, Virtual Design and Construction
AbstractThe primary aim of this research project was to investigate the possibility of tunneling the upcoming California High-Speed Train tracks, thereby avoiding an above-ground train. Our investigations focus primarily on the social, economic, and political implications of tunneling. The three means by which we investigate these issues are: • Asurvey of stakeholders to understand the goals and preferences with regard to the project as a whole. • An economic model with variable inputs that determines the financial feasibility of a tunneled option • An urban design study of four alternative development schemes Survey Conclusions A survey of local residents, employees, and Stanford students showed that survey respondents: • Care more about minimizing the visual impact, noise and environmental impact of the rail line significantly more than the cost of the project. • Are in favor of a HSR station in Palo Alto, even if it brings high-density development to the area. • Believe that the two greatest concerns about HSR are the physical division of Palo Alto and the noise, vibration and other disturbances due to HSR operation, which indicates a strong opposition to an above ground alignment. Our economic calculations showed that if the High-Speed Rail Authority contributed $500 million to the project, Palo Alto would need to raise approximately $1.3 billion for the tunneled option. • For the Tunneled HSR with mid-density development and a 1% sales tax, there is a $773 million funding deficit. • For the Tunneled HSR with high-density development and a 1% sales tax, there is a $291 million funding deficit. • For the Tunneled HSR with extreme high-density development and a 0.5% sales tax, the funding requirement is met.
URLhttps://purl.stanford.edu/gz429pj4301
PDF Linkhttps://stacks.stanford.edu/file/druid:gz429pj4301/TR189.pdf
Citation Key670